Where to go

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There are thousands of incredible places to visit in the UK and Ireland

Arundel

Arundel & Chichester

South East England

Chichester was originally a Roman settlement. While little of this settlement remains today apart from the Roman palace at Fishbourne on the outskirts of the city, Chichester has much ancient character with its 11th century Cathedral, 16th century market cross, and many fine old buildings.

Chichester is ideally placed for exploring the glorious coastline and the stunning surrounding countryside of the South Downs.

There are also some great beaches just south of Chichester, at Selsey and West & East Wittering.

Bath

Bath

South West England

Bath owes its importance to its hot springs, which are unique in Britain. The Romans built a great bathing complex here, and the site (now of world heritage status) includes the most impressive Roman remains in Britain and one of the best preserved Roman spas in the world. The Pump Room directly above the Roman Baths offers an opportunity to drink the spa water, or have traditional afternoon tea there.

A visit to Bath must include the majestic Royal Crescent as well as the city's other famous landmark, the Pulteney Bridge, which is lined with tiny shops in an Italianate style. Bath Abbey is beautiful both inside and out, and you can also take a tour including 220 steps to the bell tower. But, Bath is not all about the history. The city also hosts a great choice of Theatre entertainment, and has a great array of fine dining options.

Belfast

Belfast

Northern Ireland

Since the new millennium, Belfast let down its scars from its heavy conflicting past and is now a vibrant and rejuvenated city in complete reinvention. Belfast played a key role in the Industrial Revolution and has kept a lot of industrial features in its architecture which gives the city a very particular character. Belfast may be the capital of Northern Ireland but it is a pleasingly walkable city laid out on a human scale.

It has four quarters each with its own identity and character. The Cathedral Quarter is the oldest quarter, located closest to the water front and dominated by the Church of Ireland Cathedral, St Anne's. The Queen's Quarter, an energetic and lively area, with the Queen's College at its heart. The area fuses entertainment, culture and commerce to create a uniquely spirited neighbourhood.

The Titanic Quarter, located in the old shipbuilding yards of Harland and Wolff. This area catapulted Belfast onto the map and gave the city its reputation and fortune. And finally, the Gaeltacht Quarer, Celtic roots, music and folklore. The Irish heritage is celebrated here in west Belfast. Along the Falls Road the Irish language, music, literature and culture have flourished.

Blackpool

Blackpool

North West England

Blackpool has been drawing holiday makers to it since the 1920's. Indeed by 1930 over 7 million holiday makers were flocking here. Most famous for its iconic tower, Blackpool has kept reinventing itself in order to retain its traditional British holiday destination tag. It has done this by managing to combine a natural seaside setting where donkey rides are still offered to children, and sticks of rock (first made in Blackpool) are still consumed and trams take tourists up and down the promenade with all the 21st century amusements at its ever popular pleasure beach, including the 'Big One' – the tallest and fastest roller coaster in Europe.

Between September and November the town is lit up with over a million individual lights at the famous Blackpool Illuminations.

Bournemouth

Bournemouth

South West England

Bournemouth's main attraction has to be its 7 mile long sandy beach fit for sunbathing, swimming and surfing. Bournemouth's latest addition is Europe's first artificial surf reef. The reef is made up of 55 giant sandbags and is the size of a football pitch. The town itself has an excellent shopping, a huge variety of restaurants and great nightlife.

Next door, the town of Poole with more water sport offerings plus a historic 18th century harbour and some attractive buildings. Along the coast Corfe Castle and although a ruin, it is still impressive, as is the beautiful surrounding countryside and views from it. Further along the Jurrasic coast is Lulworth Cove with the fascinating Durdle Door, an archway carved out by the sea.

Brighton

Brighton

South East England

Brighton has become one of the most vibrant, colourful and creative cities in Europe has often been called 'London by the sea' mainly because of its great nightlife, numerous festivals offer a diverse range of entertainment, while it also has a sophisticated side with a superb arts diary.

The Victorian Brighton Pier has plenty of fairground rides, arcades and food options, while the Royal Pavilion is the must see attraction in Brighton. Contrasting Indian architecture with Chinese styled interior and it is one of the most exotically beautiful buildings in Britain. The Lanes offer an eclectic mix of independent shops and boutiques, with its fair share of quirkiness!

Bristol

Bristol

South West England

Bristol's most famous son is Isambad Kingdom Brunel the greatest Victorian designer and architect, building railways, bridges, steam boats and the SS Great Britain culminating in his finest work - the Clifton Suspension bridge. Bristol has played an extremely important role in sea trade for hundreds of years, and the harbour is still at the centre of the city today. In recent years the Harbourside has undergone an impressive development, which includes new science and nature discovery centres and IMAX cinema and plenty of trendy restaurants as well as good nightlife. You can take a boat to explore the city's historic waterways. King Street is both picturesque and lively and includes the Theatre Royal – the oldest continuously working theatre in Britain. In Central Bristol Broadmead and Cabot Circus are where you'll find an array of high street names and department stores to fulfill all your shopping needs.

Caernarfon

Caernarfon

Wales

Over a century after Julius Caesar first invaded Britain, the Romans finally arrived in North Wales. Their main objective was Ynys Mn (the island of Anglesey), then home of the Druids, teachers and spiritual leaders of the Celtic tribes of Britain and beyond. 77AD saw North West Wales finally conquered, and a fort (Segontium) was established in what is now Caernarfon and became the western frontier of the Roman Empire for over 300 years.

The gem of Caernarfon has to be its impressive castle built by Edward I, whose first son was born there, and led to the British monarch's first son being given the title 'Prince of Wales'.

Cambridge

Cambridge

Central England

Cambridge is one of Britain's most famous cities. It combines the atmosphere of a rural town with the grandeur and tradition of its ancient university which dominates the city. The university began in 1209, when fighting between scholars and locals in Oxford, led to students setting up a university in Cambridge. Today punting on the river Cam is commonplace. Cambridge is also a very bicycle friendly city with plenty of cycle paths connecting all the major attractions. Cambridge has lots of museums including the Fitzwilliam Museum, which houses an outstanding picture collection. The city is also home to one of only 4 round churches in Britain.

Cambridge boasts Michelin starred restaurants, and has an diversity of culinary delights including Thai, Italian, French, Spanish and many gastropubs.

Canterbury

Canterbury

South East England

The Romans built a settlement at Canterbury in AD200, and later became the capital of the Saxon Kingdom of Kent. In AD597 St Augustine arrived to bring the Christian message and convert the then King Ethelberht. It's no surprise today then that a visit to Canterbury must include the Cathedral, which is one of the most famous Christian structures in the country and cathedral of the Archbishop of Canterbury, leader of the Church of England and of the worldwide Anglican Church.

The city of Canterbury is great to explore, especially through its traffic-free High Street. You can enjoy a walk along the city walls; visit the West Gate, one of the finest medieval fortified gatehouses in England and offers superb panoramic views of the city. Being a student city it also has its fair share of nightlife and many superb restaurants and eateries.

Cardiff

Cardiff

Wales

Cardiff is the capital city of Wales, and in recent years has developed itself into a truly modern and cosmopolitan place, offering the best in culture, history and sporting entertainment as well as plenty of fine dining and great nightlife.

There are stunning new buildings such as the Millennium Centre – a fantastic arts and cultural venue – the slate and glass Welsh Parliament Building and the Millennium Stadium with its impressive sliding roof. Despite its modern look, the city is not afraid to remember its past and the National Museum – one of the best in Europe – and Cardiff's centrally located Castle do this well.

Cardigan

Cardigan Bay

Wales

The Cardigan Bay coastline is one of Britain's most diverse areas for marine wildlife. It is home to a pod of over 100 bottlenose dolphins as well as porpoises and grey seals. You can enjoy Eco-friendly boat trips out to see the wildlife from New Quay. Picturesque Aberaeron with its stone walled harbour is where you can pick up an award winning honey ice cream while viewing the beautiful brightly coloured house facades which line the streets of the town. Further along the coast, hidden coves and sandy beaches offer an escape from the crowds. You can get great food at the Harbourmaster Restaurant.

Further inland small villages and market towns nestle in the hills and valleys. There are also several nature reserves, home to rare species of flora and fauna. There are plenty of walking trails and a 35 km mountain biking trail in the Cambrian Mountains for the more adventurous!

Cheltenham

Cheltenham

Central England

Cheltenham was transformed into Cheltenham Spa in 1738 when the 'Old Well' was discovered. King George III came to enjoy the waters in 1788 and stayed for 5 weeks and soon it became Britain's most important spa. Cheltenham Spa is probably the most complete Regency town in England; the 'town within a park' offers beautiful parks and gardens, tree-lined avenues and colourful floral displays. Cheltenham's most famous son, Gustav Holst (composer of 'The Planets'), was born here in 1874 and his birthplace is now the Holst Museum.

The town is also a great base from which to visit neighbouring Gloucester, a historic city with a magnificent cathedral built by Benedictine monks in the 12th century.

Chester

Chester

North West England

There has been a settlement at Chester, since the Romans built a fort here in AD79. The city walls are the most complete city walls in Britain, with some sections still intact from 120 AD, while most of the existing wall is Medieval. Within the walls the red sandstone Cathedral dates from 1093 and stands it is believed on the same site as a temple dedicated to Apollo existed until Christianity became the religion of the Roman Empire. Also within the walls The Rows are a series of half-timbered buildings joined with long galleries which make a shopping mall – Tudor style!

To the south of the walls, lies the remains of a Roman Amphitheatre, built in the 1st century AD and once a 7,000 seater arena, the largest in the country under Roman occupation.

Conwy

Conwy & Llandudno

Wales

Victorian Buildings dominate the mile long bay and has enabled Llandudno to retain the 19th century ambience which made it the place to stay for Victorians and European royalty alike, as they enjoyed shopping along wrought iron and glass verandas of Mostyn Street that still feature today.

For kids the sandy beach could provide the highlight; others will prefer the 125 year old pier with its plethora of shops, cafes, bars and attractions to suit all tastes; but without doubt, everyone will enjoy the cable-driven tramway to the headland known as the Great Orme with stunning views of the bay below. History lovers will find Great Orme's ancient church and ancient copper mines of great interest, and culture vultures will enjoy the museums and Venue Cymru to take in ballet, comedy or a musical.

Cornwall

Cornwall

South West England

The mighty cliffs and crashing wave, the glorious sandy beaches, the wild moorlands and peaceful woodlands make Cornwall one of the favourite UK destinations. Situated in the South West of England, this region has never formally been integrated into England, which is why some still believe that Cornwall is a separate country! It is known to have the strongest national identity in the UK, in fact Cornwall has had an identity distinct from the English for centuries as is evidenced by the existence of the Cornish language as a mother tongue up until the early 19th century.

Cornwall has two coastlines: the Atlantic coast famous for its surfing beaches and huge expanses of golden sand, and the English Channel coast which is gentler with hidden coves and tranquil creeks. In fact, 80% of Cornwall is surrounded by water and the region hosts more than 300 beaches! It's no surprise that you will plenty of tourist activities to suit everyone from walking or bird watching to the extremes of kite surfing and coasteering.

Clare

County Clare

Ireland

Clare is a stunning county in western Ireland. The incredible landscape here ranges from rolling countryside to craggy Atlantic coastline.One of the most popular landscapes here is called The Burren; a uniquely rocky wilderness region which houses ancient Stone Age monuments and churches that have been here for centuries. Another huge attraction is the breathtaking Cliffs of Moher. Thhis 213m high Cliff Top is home to O'Brien's Tower which offers incredible ocean panoramas. Elswewhere the town of Shannon, hosts the famous 15th-century Bunratty Castle and its folk park.

Cork

County Cork

Ireland

Steeped in history, Ireland's third city Cork is becoming one of Europe's hippest cities. We can trace back the history of the city some 1400 years ago when a monastery was founded. The city became an important seaport and gradually climbed up the steep banks on both sides of the River Lee.

The city is pretty unique because it has been built upon water, and the city centre is on an island in the River Lee so that you find yourself constantly crossing bridges. The best way to see Cork and is to walk: there is a very helpful and free signpost Walking Tour. You can get the booklet with lots of information about the different places of Cork from the tourist office and set off to explore the hilly streets and meet the people!

Though Cork used to be in the shadow of its rival Dublin, it's now getting a cultural reputation to rival the capitals. Since 2005 when Cork was nominated European Capital of Culture, the transformation of the city continues apace with plenty of new buildings, bars and arts centres. The best of the city is still happily traditional though – snug pubs with live music sessions most of the week, excellent local produce in an ever-expanding list of restaurants and a genuinely proud welcome from the locals.

Down

County Down

Northern Ireland

County Down is a spectacular region of Northern Ireland that has picturesque, low rolling hills which roll directly into the contrasting Mourne Mountaina and Slieve Donard. This mystical and inspiring landscape inspired CS Lewis to create the magical land of Narnia in the well-loved children's story books. The history of County Down stretches back over 7000 years and unsurprisingly plays home to wealth of ancient heritage sites. The most famous of these is Downpatrick, the area in which the patron saint of Ireland is said to be buried.

Slieve Donard is Northern Ireland's highest mountain, which sits beautifully in the stunning Mourne Mountains – a range which sweeps directly into the sea. The Mournes are close to Dublin and Belfast and very easy to access yet in contrast to these great cities it is like entering another world.

The picturesque gateway to the Mourne's is the popular Victorian seaside town of Newcastle. Newcastle combines high mountain passes with beautiful sandy beaches and has been recently redeveloped making it the perfect base for exploring Murlough National Nature Reserve and the Mourne Mountains.

Mayo

County Mayo

Ireland

County Mayo is a beautiful part of Ireland which is made up of several highly popular Tourist Regions. Achill Island is accessible by road bridge and consists of some of Ireland's most beautiful landscapes, cliffs, beaches and views.

Futher inland are the popular historic towns of Castlebar and Westport. Both towns are steeped in Irish history, natural beauty and plenty to do. A drive around County Mayo will reveal many hidden treasures and beauty spots and is quite simply one of the loveliest areas of this stunning country.

Donegal

Donegal

Ireland

County Donegal in Northern Ireland is characterised by winding country roads which are surrounded by remote village, fields, pastures, mountains, sea cliffs and dramatic peninsulas, streams and carpets of purple wild heather. If you're a person who's travelling to Ireland to get away from it all then this is the destination for you. Donegal Town itself is set in the Valley surrounded by Barnesmore Mountains and Donegal. The town is steeped in history and surrounded by the remains of several earthen forts.

Dublin

Dublin

Ireland

Dublin has become one of Europe's most desirable places to visit for holidays and short weekend breaks and is often referred as the "Europe's friendliest city ". The city of Dublin has had a rich and varied history: it has played host to the early Celts, Christian monastic settlements, the Vikings, the Normans and Cromwellians... to name a few! Evidence of this can be found in every corner of the city. From a cultural point of view that means plenty for visitors to see, from historic sites and landmarks to famous monuments and museums. But modern day Dublin mostly dates from the 17th century, with a presence of fine Georgian architecture throughout the city.

Dublin is a compact City and most of the visitor attractions are within walking distance of each other.

Temple Bar is one of the most famous areas of the city; it is famed for its fun pubs and great party atmosphere. A walk through its narrow cobbled thoroughfares will reveal a huge array of funky establishments and independent businesses, from boho cafés to vintage and speciality shops, piercing and tattoo artists to second-hand music stores.

Dundee

Dundee & St Andrews

Scotland

Dundee, founded in the 12th century, grew due to a combination of weaving, whaling and ship building. The city already had many skilled in weaving, so when whale oils could be used to soften the jute, brought from India in the large fast ships constructed here, Dundee became the jute capital of the world. After the decline of these industries, Dundee diversified into confectionary and jam production and Scotland's 4th largest city continues to adapt well to economic ups and downs. The city also brought us the comics: Beano and Desperate Dan. Indeed a statue of Desperate Dan stands proud in the city square. Dundee has a number of great attractions, including the fascinating Verdant works which tells the story of the city's jute industry and the RRS Discovery – Captain Scott's Antarctic ship which was built here in 1901. The city has a lively arts scene and a blossoming cultural quarter where thought-provoking art and literature sit alongside cosmopolitan cinema and theatre.

St Andrew's (which after 600 years without an apostraphe gained it's ' making St Andrews St Andrew's in April 2013) is an ancient university city with a rich history and famous throughout the world for its golf course.

Durham

Durham

North East England

Near the end of the 10th century monks on the island of Lindisfarne fled from Viking invaders and eventually settled in the area on which the city of Durham now stands. A short time later the Normans invaded England and eventually took control of Durham from the Saxons. In 1072 The Normans built a castle in the city so they could keep its inhabitants in order. In 1093 the Norman Bishop William of Calais began a Cathedral.

Today both castle and Cathedral form one of the most stunning city panoramas in Europe and have been given World Heritage Site status, which along with the city's winding cobbled streets and cosmopolitan cafes, make it one of the finest cultural and historic destinations in the UK.

Edinburgh

Edinburgh

Scotland

Edinburgh is the capital of Scotland, and combines everything you would want in a historic city from its famous castle, royal palace, narrow medieval streets and Georgian squares to a dynamic modern dimension that includes international festivals, cutting edge arts, trendy bars and enticing restaurants all amidst a cosmopolitan environment but with a noticeably Scottish flavour. The city centre has two distinct parts. The New Town to the north has Princes Street the main shopping street, while the Old Town south and east of castle ridge is brimming with history as you explore the atmospheric cobbled streets and alleys.

Please note, unless you plan to visit the Edinburgh Fringe Festival or Military Tattoo, we highly recommend avoiding Edinburgh in August if possible

Exmoor

Exmoor

South West England

Exmoor is one of the smallest of Britain's National Parks, but contains within it an open landscape of wild open moors and wooded valleys so you can enjoy walks, cycle or take a horse ride along the excellent trail network, including 600 miles of marked footpaths. The national park is home to many rare and important species of plants, birds and animals, a treat for all nature lovers. You can also enjoy the comforts of a local cream tea in one of Exmoor's beautiful villages including Dunster with its 14th century church and priory, 18th century water mill and castle which overlooks the village.

On the north coast of the National Park lie the twin towns of Lynton and Lynmouth - dubbed the Little Swizerland of England bye the Victorians because of the spectacular scenery and cliff railway.

Fermanagh

Fermanagh

Ireland

Sligo is the largest town in the North-West and dates back to the 13th century. It is nestled in a truly stunning and scenic countryside and can very easily compete with Killarney... without the crowd! This former fishing town is built on several gravel ridges giving it an interesting and cosy appearance and centres around its five bridges. It is nowadays a thriving and lively little town steeped in tradition with its many pubs offering live music and its traffic-free streets with its many restaurants.

Dean

Forest of Dean & Wye Valley

Wales

The Forest of Dean & Wye Valley is a truly magical part of Britain; packed with stunning scenery, enchanting forests, fairy-tale castles, charming churches, dramatic caves, mystical moorlands and truly romantic landscapes. There is so much to do here for both the adventurous explorers, the adrenaline junkies and for anyone who simply appreciates stunning natural beauty. With plenty of towns, villages and landscapes simply waiting to be explored, this is a great place to truly experience natural Britain at its best.

Glencoe

Fort William (Scottish Highlands)

Scotland

Lying in the shadow of Ben Nevis - the UK's highest mountain, Fort William is the self proclaimed outdoor capital of Scotland. It is a great base from which to explore some of the most stunning landscapes Britain has to offer on foot, by boat, by gondola or mountain bike. The town offers a wide range of shops, restaurants and essential services as well as all kinds of recreational facilities.

Galway

Galway

Ireland

At the mouth of Galway Bay is the picturesque and lively city of Galway. Now one of the fastest growing cities in Europe, it was originally a small fishing village with a strategic coastal location and natural harbour area. Galway has changed considerably over the last few years and the city now enjoys a fascinating juxtaposition of new and ancient architecture, but the city still features many relics of its medieval past and is worth taking time to explore. The centre of the city is conveniently compact enough to walk around comfortably.

Causeway

Giant's Causeway Coast

Northern Ireland

Northern Ireland's number-one attraction, the Giant's Causeway (a UNESCO World Heritage Site) were formed around 62 million years ago featuring approximately 40,000 hexagonal columns. The fascinating patterns you see in the causeway stones formed as a result of the red-hot lava crystallizing under conditions of accelerated cooling when it came into immediate contact with water. But the legend says an Irish giant, Fionn mac Cumhaill built the causeway to walk to Scotland to fight his enemy Benandonner. You can walk upon the stones of this natural wonder on two of well-established footpaths and enjoy the view of its surroundings on a boat trip.

Glasgow

Glasgow

Scotland

Glasgow is Scotland's largest city. What it lacks in historical interest compared to its city rival Edinburgh, it makes up for in style and culture. This vibrant and energetic city has undergone somewhat of a rejuvenation over the past few decades, and the result is a fantastic blend of internationally acclaimed museums and galleries, some stunning architecture, a vibrant nightlife which includes a huge diversity of pubs, clubs and a great live music scene as well as plenty of theatre options as well as fine dining. Glasgow also boasts Scotland's best shopping.

Glasgow is also home to Scotland's two most dominant football clubs and great rivals - Celtic and Rangers.

Greenwich

Greenwich

London

Greenwich is the home of Greenwich Mean Time, the meridian line and home to important landmarks such as the National Maritime Museum and the Royal Observatory. Greenwich is a village which became incorporated into the larger city of London as Britain's capital grew, but has managed to keep its own identify, and despite being so close to central London, still has a village feel. It has many quirky independent shops, and great street markets. Greenwich Park located on a hill has fantastic views across the river to Canary Wharf, St Paul's Cathedral and beyond. The Park contains a small herd of Fallow and Red deer and you can enjoy a drink and a bite to eat in the Pavilion Tea house. Greenwich can be accessed easily from Central London on the Docklands Light Railway or you can take the river boat along the Thames.

Harrogate

Harrogate

North East England

The charming Victorian Spa town of Harrogate is home to an array of exclusive shops, pavement cafés, bars and top notch restaurants. The town is also a frequent winner of Britain in Bloom, and as you walk along the tree lined streets, the floral displays can be stunning. The Turkish Baths in this spa town are carefully maintained and open to the public seven days a week. For music lovers, band concerts take place on Sunday afternoons throughout the summer, and a lively local music scene includes a wide variety of styles from folk to blues and Jazz. If you are into art, then Harrogate's 3 galleries are a must see.

Hastings

Hastings

South East England

Hastings is a seaside resort and fishing port - The tall wooden huts used for drying the fishing nets still remain. The town also has two cliff railways. It's better known for the battle of Hastings in 1066. However, the most famous battle in England's history actually took place 7 miles further north, where the small town of Battle lies. West of the old town is the beach, and beyond that you'll find lots of Georgian and Victorian buildings. Hastings also boasts a lively arts scene.

The medieval and walled town and port of Rye is further east up the coast, with twisting cobbled streets and lanes and some great old buildings, many of them timber framed. St Mary's church has one of the oldest functioning church turret clocks in the country. You can see it up close by climbing the tower which also offers splendid views of Rye Bay.

Inverness

Inverness

Scotland

Inverness, the attractive capital of the Highlands and Scotland's millennium city, makes an ideal base for exploring the area. The city is thought to date back to the 6th century as the Pictish capital and a trading centre for fish, wool and furs. Today it is dominated by the pink sandstone castle which has been built and restored over the centuries due to various battles over the years which left the castle in need of repair. The city is largely modern looking with plenty of shops, places to eat and drink, and plenty of peaceful areas close to the centre for relaxing.

Inverness also hosts the largest Highland Games. Surrounding the city is some awesome countryside with hillsides and lochs in plentiful supply and dolphins cruises available in the nearby Moray Firth. Just south of Inverness is the world famous Loch Ness and of course the Loch Ness monster lurking somewhere within!

Mull

Isle of Mull

Scotland

A short ferry journey from the mainland, The Isle of Mull is a wonderful place to visit, especially if you're a nature lover. Not only is it one of the best places to see birds of prey in the UK, but there are ample opportunities to view marine life all around the island including whales, seals, dolphins and more amidst some gorgeous hillscapes which walkers will enjoy.

Tobermory, capital of Mull, is one of the prettiest ports in Scotland, thanks to the colourful houses and a sheltered bay. It is also the setting for the UK kids show Balamory. Mull is also a great base for taking a boat trip over to explore the islands of Iona, Coll and Tiree.

Skye

Isle of Skye

Scotland

Skye is Scotland's largest island, full of beauty and a variety of scenery. Though often cloudy (Skye is the Norse word for cloud!) this actually can bring a sense of mystery to the island, and any rain showers are more than made up for by the spectacular mountain scenery which include the unmissable Cuillin Ridge; extensive wildlife and a range of activities including walking, cycling, pony trekking and a host of boat trips to choose from. It also has a milder climate than you might imagine for somewhere as far north, making it much more hospitable than some of the Scottish Highlands.

Portree is the island's main town. Its picturesque natural harbour has beautifully coloured houses surrounded by high cliffs, and many of the town's main activities take place here. The town is the main cultural centre for the island with concerts, exhibitions and theatre performances.

Wight

Isle of Wight

South East England

The island has 60 miles of spectacular coastline, with picturesque coves and beautiful bays of golden sand. Inland the countryside is just as stunning, with gentle rolling hills and little lanes to explore. With over 60 miles of cycle ways, the island is a dream for cyclists too. Apart from being one of the prime places for sailing in the UK, the island offers a plethora of sporting activities from fishing and golf to windsurfing and para-gliding.

History lovers will enjoy Carisbrooke Castle, and most will marvel at the extravagance of Osborne House, built for Queen Victoria and Prince Albert.

The island is a short 10 minute journey by hovercraft or catamaran from Portsmouth, while ferries from Southampton and the New Forest take around 30 minutes. A train operates down the east side of the island enabling you to explore the beach resorts of Sandown and Shanklin, while a round the island bus service gets you further afield including the gorgeous bay at Ventnor, or to the western side of the island to Alum Bay and the Needles.

Kilkenny

Kilkenny

Ireland

Situated on the banks of the River Nore, Kilkenny city is Ireland's most historic and compact medieval city. Dominated by an 800-year-old Norman castle, Kilkenny is a compact city with narrow and winding streets full of historic buildings, restaurants, pubs and bars. Kilkenny is also sometimes called the 'marble city' because of its distinctive indigenous jet black marble, which resembles a slate-coloured marble.

Kinsale

Kinsale

Ireland

Only 17 miles from Cork is the lovely sea town of Kinsale. The town believed to be founded by the Angrlo Normans in 1177 was once a medieval fishing port which makes it a picturesque and authentic town, very popular in Ireland during summer. Kinsale is an attractive little town with hosting one of the most cosmopolitan and charming ports, a long waterfront and narrow winding streets full of gourmet restaurants.

Lakes

Lake District

North West England

This beautiful national park combines soaring mountains, plunging waterfalls and serene lakes with character filled charming villages creating a landscape which has inspired poets, writers and artists for years. It's a walkers paradise with a never ending supply of mountain walking with stunning views around every corner.

At the heart of South Lakeland is Windermere, England's longest lake, a real hive of activity and a paradise for watersports enthusiasts. Keswick is the main centre in the north of the park. Nestled on the shores of Derwentwater, at the foot of the imposing Mount Skiddaw, there are a wide array of shops, restaurants and galleries in the town, and a plethora of walks and water based activities to be done nearby.

Lancaster

Lancaster

North West England

Lancaster is a vibrant university city with a wealth of history. A Roman Fort was built here in 80AD, and today the Castle which was built by the Normans around 1,000 years ago takes pride of place on the same hill overlooking the city. As well as being the county town of Lancashire, the city has been of importance through the years, especially as a port during the 18th century when it figured significantly in the Slave trade. Its cobbled streets are lined with smart, Georgian stone houses filled with lively shops, bars and restaurants.

Leeds

Leeds

North East England

Leeds was built on the textile and tailoring trades, but its smoke blackened mills have made way for more modern developments. The Corn Exchange is one of the most impressive buildings in Leeds, filled with an array of unusual small shops. In the Victoria Quarter former Victorian shopping arcades have been restored in recent years, and house a number of designer shops. Leeds Kirkgate Market is Europe's largest indoor market with over 600 stalls. Open 6 days a week, traders offer freshness, variety, value for money and friendly service in a great atmosphere Leeds has a vibrant nightlife with plenty of good pubs and clubs, plus theatres and both mainstream and Art-house cinemas.

Limerick

Limerick

Ireland

Set in a picturesque location by the River Shannon, Limerick is the third biggest city of the Republic of Ireland. A city of many contrasts, the juxtaposition of the modern and the old makes Limerick one of the top destinations in Ireland, offering a wide range of excellent shops and restaurants. Older than London, the city's origins date back to when the Vikings sailed up the Shannon Estuary in 922 and founded a settlement on an island. Nowadays, you can still find traces of its rich medieval past in the narrow and winding streets.

Lincoln

Lincoln

Central England

Lincoln is a beautiful town of Celtic origin, and one of the richest cities in Britain during the sixteenth century due to the fabrics and garments they produced. The main attraction in Lincoln is of course its outstanding and beautiful cathedral but that's not all that's on offer here. The region has many beautiful natural features making it a wonderful centre for nature lovers as well as historians. The area has a wealth of fascinating museums dedicated to everything from its Aviation history to its place of significance in British history. The region does of course have another claim to fame – the rich Christian heritage which it's many sites and houses have played a significant role in. The region was the birthplace of the Baptist, Methodist and AOG (Pentecostal) churches which are now International denominations.

Liverpool

Liverpool

North West England

Liverpool, once a major port and trading centre for the UK, has restored many of its former architectural treasures as well as introducing some new modern constructions. Liverpool's waterfront and docks is a Unesco World Heritage site due to the number of listed buildings. It also has one of the best cultural scenes in the country with top class museums and galleries. The nightlife is great and of course we can't forget that for the Beatles fan, this is the city to be in, and watching a band at the famous Cavern Club or seeing a musical or concert at Liverpool's Empire Theatre. 'Liverpool One' has excellent shopping and dining.

LochLomond

Loch Lomond

Scotland

Just half an hour north of Glasgow is Loch Lomond, the largest expanse of inland water in Great Britain, and part of a National Park that includes both the loch and the inspirational scenery of the Trossachs. Loch Lomond has some wonderful contrasts. At the north end, the loch is much narrower and deeper, surrounded by dramatic mountain scenery, with Queen Elizabeth Forest Park on the east shoreline and Loch Katrine and the Trossachs beyond. Further down towards the south-eastern end of the Loch, deciduous woodlands hug the shoreline along with the sheltered harbour at Balmaha, an ideal place for water sports and the calm waters make for great canoeing. Balloch Castle Country Park at the southern end provides gentler walking.

Ferries and pleasure cruises operate on the loch from the lochside communities of Tarbet, Balloch, Balmaha and Luss and are a perfect way to explore the area.

London

London

London

Within Central London the visitor will of course find plenty of British tradition – shown in its historic old buildings such as the beautiful St Paul's Cathedral, the once seen never forgotten Houses of Parliament, and the legendary Tower Bridge. However, you'll also find the future embraced in a wealth of new architectural delights such as the Millennium Bridge and the innovative design of 30 St Mary Axe, better known as 'The Gherkin'. London also captures the rich diversity of cultures and traditions that have become an integral part of London's different communities who put their mark of character in various parts of this great city.

Londonderry

Londonderry

Northern Ireland

Londonderry – also known as Derry is the only completely Walled City in the British Isles. The walls were built in the 17th century as defences for early seventeenth century settlers from England and Scotland. It is well worth the visit if you're based in Belfast and want to make an excursion out of the capital. Situated around 62 miles away, the trip would take around 90 minutes. Derry will keep you busy with its beautiful riverside setting, its several fascinating historical sites and the numerous museums, galleries and theatres, as well as thriving musical and literary scenes.

Malvern

Malvern

Central England

Nestled in the beautiful rolling Malvern Hills, the Victorian Spa-town of Great Malvern's steep rambling streets and tree lined avenues still retain an air of refinement from the Victorian era. More than the town itself though, it is the surrounding countryside that draws people here now. The Malvern Hills have been described as a mountain range in miniature, the eight mile ridge containing some of the oldest rocks in Britain, With a myriad of trails and 18 peaks to climb it is a walkers delight. In the Malvern Hills you can enjoy walking, horse riding, mountain biking, hang-gliding, climbing and fishing.

Manchester

Manchester

North West England

Over the past 15 years Manchester has reinvented itself into a vibrant modern metropolis. It has become a shopper's paradise and the endless blend of old and new bars and clubs, plus the wide selection of restaurants make it an awesome night out. There is plenty here for the history lover, as Manchester clings on to its industrial history with museums and heritage abound. If you're a sports fan then this city can also keep you busy with many top teams in a vast array of sporting genres. A free bus can transport you easily around the city centre, while the city's tram system can take you to attractions a bit further out.

Newforest

New Forest

South West England

The New Forest was only designated a National Park in 2005, but the forest is far from new. As far back as 1079 William the Conqueror designated the area as a Royal Forest for private hunting, and at the time people were forced to leave their settlements.

As well as taller trees, there are large areas of lowland habitats, including bogs and heath land which provide for a wealth of flora and fauna. Today ponies graze on wild heaths speckled with purple heather and wild deer flit beneath gnarled oak and beech trees. Streams flow to the wide expanse of the Solent where forest meets shining sea. But there's more to the New Forest than natural beauty – thatched villages, inviting pubs and a real sense of history combine with watersports, scenic walking and cycling to make one of Britain's most enchanting and varied destinations.

There are also some charming villages lying in or bordering the New Forest. Lyndhurst, the largest village is a popular tourist location with many interesting shops, cafes, pubs and hotels. Bucklers Hard became an important ship building village, using timber from the New Forest.

Newcastle

Newcastle

North East England

Newcastle is the commercial and industrial capital of the North-East. Although the locals have always loved their home city, it's in recent years that people have been flocking in from outside to see what all the fuss is about. The iconic Tyne bridge (a twin of the Sydney Harbour bridge) is one of 7 bridges that link the city of Newcastle to Gateshead south of the river Tyne. Along the Quayside are a plethora of restaurants, bars and clubs to choose from. On Sundays you can spend hours browsing at the market. The compact Victorian city centre has some classic old buildings, while the Ouseburn valley is home to great bars and clubs as well as a new art gallery called the Biscuit factory. Newcastle's Metro is an excellent public transport system which will get you efficiently to all the major sites and attractions in the city including museums, galleries and heritage sites.

Northumberland

Northumberland

North East England

Northumberland is probably most famous for Hadrian's Wall. Built by the Romans to keep out the Scots, and keep the English in, it is one of the Roman Empire's most impressive achievements.

Northumberland also has a beautiful coastline and some remarkable islands. Inland the National Park has a remote wilderness quality that will immediately take you away from the hustle and bustle of modern Britain, and help you picture life in Roman times. A number of hill forts - old settlements enclosed within massive dry stone walls. These would have contained perhaps one or two extended families. They date to around 300 BC and some 50 examples lie within the National Park boundary.

Nottingham

Nottingham

Central England

Today Nottingham has one of the most stylish urban environments with more café-bars and elegant restaurants than any city of the same size. Despite its modern sophistication, history is never far away, with many reminders of Nottingham's legendary hero Robin Hood and his historic adversary the Sheriff of Nottingham. The Sheriff of Nottingham still has an important role in 21st century civic life, working alongside the Lord Mayor to represent the city. The city is also famous for its lace shops and factories which were internationally renowned following the industrial revolution. Among Nottingham's important historical sites and features are its unique labyrinth of caves under the city, the splendid mansion that is now Nottingham Castle Museum and Art Gallery, and the spot where Charles I raised his standard to begin the English Civil War.

Oxford

Oxford

Central England

Oxford is most famous for having the oldest university in the English speaking world, with teaching occurring as long ago as the 11th century. The many university colleges and riverside setting give the city a great character and charm.

Oxford has many literary links and some stunning film and TV locations. Its many shops are filled with local character and you can be entertained by music and drama ranging from candlelit evensong in college chapels to Shakespeare in the park.

Finally, Oxford's lively mix of restaurants, pubs, theatres and tourist attractions give this historic city an extremely vibrant and cosmopolitan buzz. The compact nature of the city means that it is very easy to explore this intriguing old city on foot.

Paris

Paris

France

Paris, France is a city of romance, culture, arts, history and renowned throughout the world as one of the most beautiful cities. If a visit here isn't on your bucket list, it probably should be. Although Paris should not technically not be included in a Great British or Great Irish Trips list of destinations, it is so easy to hop between London and Paris thanks to the channel tunnel many of our customers ask to include Paris in their itinerary.
The city includes some of the world's most iconic landmarks such as the Eiffel Tower and the Arc De Triomphe as well as some of the most famous works of art such as the Mona Lisa and Venus De Milo. Montmartre – the artists quarter is situated just behind the Moulin Rouge whilst Notre Dame Cathedral and the Sacre Coeur church are just some of the names with which we will all be familiar.
There is way too much of Paris to include on this single page alone so below we've listed some of the most popular attractions but of course, there are hundreds more. If you would like to include Parisian destinations on your list that are not mentioned here, simply add it to the notes when you send in your itinerary.

Peaks

Peak District National Park

Central England

Britain's first national park is a diverse landscape, comprising heather-dappled moorland, murky limestone caves, gentle hills and gritstone outcrops. For the energetic, there's a huge choice of activities to do from walking, cycling and horse riding to climbing, caving and paragliding. Within the national park are a number of cultural gems including the sumptuous stately homes of Chatsworth house and Haddon Hall and the Georgian architecture of spa-town Buxton. The peak district is also home to the famous Bakewell tart.

Pembrokeshire

Pembrokeshire

Wales

Pembrokeshire Coast National Park on the south west tip of Wales is a spectacular coastal region, surrounded on three sides by the sea. As well as more blue flag beaches than any other county in Britain, it also has the delightful seaside towns of Tenby and St Davids. Offshore, the marine nature reserve islands of Skomer, Skokholm and Grassholm are home to over half a million seabirds including colonies of puffins, guillemots, gannets and cormorants plus dolphins, porpoises and seals.

Named after the patron saint of Wales, St Davids is an ancient cathedral settlement going back 14 centuries, and is also Britain's smallest city with a population of under 2000. The main focus of the city is its beautiful 12th century cathedral. The narrow streets of this small settlement are home to a vast array of galleries, restaurants and cafe bars. You will see the flag of St David flying here and around Wales – a gold cross on a black background.

Pitlochry

Pitlochry

Scotland

In the heart of Scotland and known as the gateway to the Highlands, the little town of Pitlochry is the perfect stopping-off point for visitors crossing the country. Set in a lovely scenery with the river Tummel flowing nearby, the town is a popular destination offering a range of independent shops, restaurant, cafes and traditional and friendly pubs. The surrounding area around Pitlochry is very beautiful, you can stroll along the river, through the woodsand open moorland, and of course, you can walk up to the dramatic Ben Vrackie situated about 6 to 8 miles from Pitlochry. From the summit, you can even see Arthur's Seat in Edinburgh on a clear day!

Portsmouth

Portsmouth

South East England

Portsmouth is a historic naval city, principal port of the British Navy and home to the world's oldest dry dock. Home to Lord Nelson's flagship HMS Victory and Henry VIII's Mary Rose, salvaged from the Seabed in 1982, Portsmouth's Historic Dockyard is not to be missed, along with the D-Day museum, while the UK's tallest publicly accessible building the Spinnaker Tower is Portsmouth's latest attraction.

The vibrant Gunwharf Quays situated on the harbourfront, has a plethora of shopping and dining options, while further down the harbour Old Portsmouth offers cobbled streets, atmospheric pubs and a small but interesting cathedral. Southsea offers more family fun in its common and Clarence Pier.

Kerry

Ring of Kerry

Ireland

The Ring of Kerry, situated on the Iveragh Peninsula, is probably the most visited attraction in Ireland outside of Dublin. This tourist trail is part of the mystical and unspoilt region of Ireland that has attracted visitors for hundreds of years.

Salisbury

Salisbury

South West England

Salisbury is most famous for having one of Britain's great Cathedrals and indeed the tallest spire of any Cathedral in England. The medieval city of Salisbury set in typically English countryside has a range of architecture from timber framed Tudor buildings to Georgian and Victorian styles. All this history combined with a modern cafe culture make it a perfect destination to explore. The tourist office also offer a decent city tour.

Apart from Salisbury's own attractions it is also a great base for exploring the many local delights such as Europe's most famous ancient site Stonehenge as well as a number of other historic sites including the the World heritage stone circle at Avebury.

Shropshire

Shropshire and Ludlow

Central England

Ludlow in Shropshire is one of the finest examples of an authentic English town. Described as "the loveliest town in England" by John Betjeman and as "the most vibrant small town in the Country" by Country Life, it's a little gem nestled in the heart of the country. Sitting on a cliff above the River Teme, Ludlow is surrounded by the unspoilt and beautiful hilly countryside of south Shropshire and the Welsh border country, known as the Welsh Marches. The centre of the town is an amazing concentration of architectural heritage, with buildings from different eras rubbing shoulders with one another (the town is said to have around 500 listed buildings!). Apart from the diversity of this built environment, Ludlow is also unique in that many of the buildings are in regular, commercial use which brings a real village feel to the town. Besides boasting a rich historical core, the town is also known as a gourmet capital with more Michelin stars per head than anywhere but Paris!

Shrewsbury is another picturesque town in Shropshire renowned to be one of England's most splendid heritage towns with over 600 listed buildings. You will very quickly fall in love with the medieval cobbled streets, alleys and squares, time-worn Tudor buildings and sweeping gardens along the River Severn.

Snowdonia

Snowdonia

Wales

Snowdonia National park in North Wales contains some dramatic scenery including over 100 lakes, 90 mountain peaks, including Mount Snowdon which at 3,560ft (1085m) is the highest mountain in England and Wales; and 37 miles of pristine coastline and beaches, moors and wetlands, plus castles, steam railways and more, so if you love the outdoors, with a bit of history thrown in, then Snowdonia is definitely the place for you.

Snowdonia's mountainous landscape makes it perfect for adventure sports like climbing, mountain biking and white water rafting, while there are also plenty of walks from strenuous all day hikes, to a gentle relaxed amble along a lakeside.

Stirling

Stirling

Scotland

Stirling has always been at the heart of history in Scotland. It was the site of some of the most famous battles for independence against the English. It is also the place where Scottish monarchs ruled for three centuries. William Wallace, played by Mel Gibson in the Oscar-winning movie Braveheart, is commemorated in the 220ft high tower of the National Wallace Monument.

Stirling's famous castle provides stunning views of the historic battle fields. Below the castle winding cobbled streets in the Old Town play host to the finest concentration of historic buildings in Scotland, including many beautifully preserved medieval and Renaissance churches. The 'Back Walk' is a scenic pathway around the Castle and Old Town to rival the city walls of York or Chester.

Stratford

Stratford upon Avon

Central England

Stratford is the birthplace of William Shakespeare who was born here in 1564. There are 5 houses linked to Shakespeare and his family and each offers a unique experience of the Stratford world in which the famous dramatist was born, worked and was buried. Stratford is also home to the Royal Shakespeare Company and its 'Courtyard Theatre' in which you can take a backstage tour. Of course, as well as all things Shakespeare, the 800 year old scenic market town has a number of other attractions so if you are more interested in music, sport, movies or dining out there is plenty to keep you busy. The town is also a pleasant place to stay to take in nearby attractions such as Warwick and Kenilworth Castles to the north, and the picturesque Cotswolds region to the south.

Suffolk

Suffolk

Central England

Filled with market towns, old fishing towns and villages, ancient abbeys, stunning woodlands and award-winning beaches, Suffolk is a perfect county to enjoy what England has best to offer.

With towns such as Lavenham which is known as England's best preserved medieval village and Bury St Edmunds which is home to an array of fantastic independent shops and Britain's smallest pub which is a fascinating historical archaeological site.

Swansea

Swansea

Wales

Birthplace of famous poet Dylan Thomas, Swansea, together with the Victorian seaside neighbour Mumbles make up an extremely vibrant region which also boasts the beautiful Gower Peninsula, Britain's first Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. There are 25 golden beaches on the peninsular some with stunning vistas, while others are tucked away in secluded coves amongst the Gower's fascinating limestone cliffs. The peninsula also has a number of mysterious monuments including Arthur's Stone and Giant's Grave, engraved stones from the Dark Age.
Swansea itself boasts award-winning parks and gardens, fantastic shopping and world class cultural and sporting facilities.

The small village of Mumbles contains a number of great little independent shops and boutiques as well as some of the area's best dining choices.

Tewkesbury

Tewkesbury

Central England

Tewkesbury is renowned for having one of the best medieval black and white townscapes in Britain. The crooked half-timbered houses make wandering the narrow streets of this town a fascinating experience.

The 12th-century Abbey with the highest Norman tower in England, dominates the town. Its fine stained glass windows and carefully sculptured tombs still remain. Other attractions include the award winning Out of the Hat visitor centre, the fascinating John Moore Countryside Museum, the Town Museum and the Old Baptist Chapel.

Cotswolds

The Cotswolds

South West England

The Cotswolds are quintessentially English. Spanning an area of gentle hills lying between the enticing cities of Stratford-upon-Avon, Bath, and Oxford, the area has pretty villages of honey-coloured stone, manor houses, charming churches, dry-stone walls and country pubs in abundance. There is a variety of architecture from black and white medieval buildings in Chipping Campden, elegant regency houses in Cirencester to traditional antique shops in Stow-on-the-wold and crooked stone cottages in Broadway.

The mix of wealth, a cosmopolitan population and strong local communities creates an audience for what is a lively arts scene. You'll find festivals, arts events, cultural happenings and galleries tucked away in even the smallest towns. If walking is your thing, why not walk the famous Cotswold Way.

Dales

The Yorkshire Dales

North East England

The Yorkshire Dales has a diverse and beautiful landscape which ranges from wide valley pastures with gently flowing rivers to crags, grasslands and moors on the hill tops, where strange rock formations and caves can be found. Add to this a patchwork of tranquil villages and bustling market towns filled with heritage and you have all the ingredients of a great escape. A few of these beautiful places are described below.

Torquay

Torquay

South West England

Torquay, often referred to as 'The English Riviera' and certainly has a continental feel about it, with a lively harbour, palm tree lined promenades, gardens and Italianate villas. It's also renowned for a great nightlife, offering many fine restaurants with great views out to sea, before you head to a theatre or club.

Paignton is a town down the coast from Torquay and offers long sandy beaches and is little more family friendly than Torquay.

Warwick

Warwick

Central England

Warwick, the county town of Warwickshire, is most famous for its magnificent castle which may well be Britain's greatest medieval attraction, with lavishly decorated state rooms, towers, ramparts and of course the dungeons!

There is more to the town than just the castle though, as venturing into the town centre you will find an attractive mix of Georgian and medieval architecture which include Oken's House - There are also a number of fascinating museums such as the Doll museum, Warwickshire museum and the impressive Leycester Hospital

Waterford

Waterford

Ireland

Waterford is the oldest city in Ireland. It managed to combine perfectly the old and the modern with its collection of pubs, gourmet restaurants and excellent shops and boutiques which co-exist with medieval city walls, picturesque cobbled back streets and the magnificence of historic buildings still standing proud after more than a thousand years. Waterford with its historic heart "The Viking Triangle" is Ireland's oldest City and is also older than all of Northern European capitals with the exception of London and Paris. Some parts of the city still feel almost medieval, with narrow alleyways leading off many of the larger streets. In 914, a great Viking and pirate, Regnall, established a base here and built a longport or ships' haven which would in time become a modern City.

Wexford

Wexford

Ireland

County Wexford is known to be the sunniest place in Ireland and comprises wide and sandy beaches which give you the opportunity to choose from a wide range of outdoor activities. The towns are historically charming in atmosphere, with museums and historic buildings to explore.

Wexford is a lively maritime town set in a beautiful scenery of mountains, rivers, valleys and unspoiled beaches. Wander through the winding streets and the lively quayside of Wexford and enjoy an array of pubs, cafes and excellent restaurants. The convenient and strategic location of Wexford near the mouth of the Slaney encouraged landings from AD 850. The town was then captured by the Normans in 1169 and you can still see traces of their fort the Irish National Heritage Park. There are reminders of its glorious Viking and Norman past in the meandering lanes off Main St, as well as some medieval monuments. This unique heritage and culture make it an essential part of any itinerary!

Whitby

Whitby & North Yorkshire Moors

North East England

The North York Moors combine dramatic moorland scenery, spectacular coastline and warm Yorkshire hospitality in its picturesque villages. Walking options are plentiful and historic sites are not in short supply either. The park has some great visitor centres at Danby, Sutton Bank and Robin Hood's bay, and the towns of Whitby, Pickering and Helmsley – all on the edge of the park make good bases from which to explore this national park.

Winchester

Winchester

South East England

Winchester is an ancient Cathedral city and also capital of England between 9th and 11th centuries under the Saxon and Danish Kings. The city has some great architecture along its narrow winding streets.

The Cathedral completed in 1094 contains one of the longest medieval naves in Europe and is one of the best buildings in southern England. The Great Hall of Winchester Castle was built in the 12th century and is famous for King Arthur's round table, which has been hung in the hall since 1463. The names of the Knights of the round table are written around edge of the table, with a picture of King Arthur on his throne.

Windsor

Windsor

London

Windsor is totally dominated by its castle, the largest in Britain, and a home of the Royal family for 900 years. The town itself has many interesting old buildings dating back to the 17th Century, particularly in the cobbled streets of the Guildhall Island. The pedestrianised area in the town provides a pleasant shopping and dining environment, with plenty of opportunities to buy your British souvenirs.

The small town of Eton is just across the River Thames on which you can enjoy a river cruise, is much quieter than its neighbour Windsor, but has much to see in its High Street which is full of peculiar buildings with Georgian facades and many timber-framed structures. The town is also home to the world famous educational establishment Eton College.

York

York

North East England

The city oozes culture and history, being one of Britain's best examples of a medieval settlement. The first settlement was founded by Romans in 71 AD. Following Roman rule, it was taken over by the Angles in 415AD. In 866 AD it was captured by the Vikings, who renamed it Jorvik. After the Norman conquest the name York was given.

York's centre is enclosed by the City walls of which more miles of wall lay in tact than any other city walls in England. The full circuit is a 3 mile walk. The Shambles is York's oldest street. The narrow medieval cobbled street is lined with 15th century Tudor buildings which lean into the street so that their roofs almost touch. The street has many charming shops, boutiques and tearooms.