Where to go

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There are thousands of incredible places to visit in the UK and Ireland

Viewing: North East England


Durham

Durham

North East England

Near the end of the 10th century monks on the island of Lindisfarne fled from Viking invaders and eventually settled in the area on which the city of Durham now stands. A short time later the Normans invaded England and eventually took control of Durham from the Saxons. In 1072 The Normans built a castle in the city so they could keep its inhabitants in order. In 1093 the Norman Bishop William of Calais began a Cathedral.

Today both castle and Cathedral form one of the most stunning city panoramas in Europe and have been given World Heritage Site status, which along with the city's winding cobbled streets and cosmopolitan cafes, make it one of the finest cultural and historic destinations in the UK.

Harrogate

Harrogate

North East England

The charming Victorian Spa town of Harrogate is home to an array of exclusive shops, pavement cafés, bars and top notch restaurants. The town is also a frequent winner of Britain in Bloom, and as you walk along the tree lined streets, the floral displays can be stunning. The Turkish Baths in this spa town are carefully maintained and open to the public seven days a week. For music lovers, band concerts take place on Sunday afternoons throughout the summer, and a lively local music scene includes a wide variety of styles from folk to blues and Jazz. If you are into art, then Harrogate's 3 galleries are a must see.

Leeds

Leeds

North East England

Leeds was built on the textile and tailoring trades, but its smoke blackened mills have made way for more modern developments. The Corn Exchange is one of the most impressive buildings in Leeds, filled with an array of unusual small shops. In the Victoria Quarter former Victorian shopping arcades have been restored in recent years, and house a number of designer shops. Leeds Kirkgate Market is Europe's largest indoor market with over 600 stalls. Open 6 days a week, traders offer freshness, variety, value for money and friendly service in a great atmosphere Leeds has a vibrant nightlife with plenty of good pubs and clubs, plus theatres and both mainstream and Art-house cinemas.

Newcastle

Newcastle

North East England

Newcastle is the commercial and industrial capital of the North-East. Although the locals have always loved their home city, it's in recent years that people have been flocking in from outside to see what all the fuss is about. The iconic Tyne bridge (a twin of the Sydney Harbour bridge) is one of 7 bridges that link the city of Newcastle to Gateshead south of the river Tyne. Along the Quayside are a plethora of restaurants, bars and clubs to choose from. On Sundays you can spend hours browsing at the market. The compact Victorian city centre has some classic old buildings, while the Ouseburn valley is home to great bars and clubs as well as a new art gallery called the Biscuit factory. Newcastle's Metro is an excellent public transport system which will get you efficiently to all the major sites and attractions in the city including museums, galleries and heritage sites.

Northumberland

Northumberland

North East England

Northumberland is probably most famous for Hadrian's Wall. Built by the Romans to keep out the Scots, and keep the English in, it is one of the Roman Empire's most impressive achievements.

Northumberland also has a beautiful coastline and some remarkable islands. Inland the National Park has a remote wilderness quality that will immediately take you away from the hustle and bustle of modern Britain, and help you picture life in Roman times. A number of hill forts - old settlements enclosed within massive dry stone walls. These would have contained perhaps one or two extended families. They date to around 300 BC and some 50 examples lie within the National Park boundary.

Dales

The Yorkshire Dales

North East England

The Yorkshire Dales has a diverse and beautiful landscape which ranges from wide valley pastures with gently flowing rivers to crags, grasslands and moors on the hill tops, where strange rock formations and caves can be found. Add to this a patchwork of tranquil villages and bustling market towns filled with heritage and you have all the ingredients of a great escape. A few of these beautiful places are described below.

Whitby

Whitby & North Yorkshire Moors

North East England

The North York Moors combine dramatic moorland scenery, spectacular coastline and warm Yorkshire hospitality in its picturesque villages. Walking options are plentiful and historic sites are not in short supply either. The park has some great visitor centres at Danby, Sutton Bank and Robin Hood's bay, and the towns of Whitby, Pickering and Helmsley – all on the edge of the park make good bases from which to explore this national park.

York

York

North East England

The city oozes culture and history, being one of Britain's best examples of a medieval settlement. The first settlement was founded by Romans in 71 AD. Following Roman rule, it was taken over by the Angles in 415AD. In 866 AD it was captured by the Vikings, who renamed it Jorvik. After the Norman conquest the name York was given.

York's centre is enclosed by the City walls of which more miles of wall lay in tact than any other city walls in England. The full circuit is a 3 mile walk. The Shambles is York's oldest street. The narrow medieval cobbled street is lined with 15th century Tudor buildings which lean into the street so that their roofs almost touch. The street has many charming shops, boutiques and tearooms.