Where to go

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There are thousands of incredible places to visit in the UK and Ireland

Viewing: South East England


Arundel

Arundel & Chichester

South East England

Chichester was originally a Roman settlement. While little of this settlement remains today apart from the Roman palace at Fishbourne on the outskirts of the city, Chichester has much ancient character with its 11th century Cathedral, 16th century market cross, and many fine old buildings.

Chichester is ideally placed for exploring the glorious coastline and the stunning surrounding countryside of the South Downs.

There are also some great beaches just south of Chichester, at Selsey and West & East Wittering.

Brighton

Brighton

South East England

Brighton has become one of the most vibrant, colourful and creative cities in Europe has often been called 'London by the sea' mainly because of its great nightlife, numerous festivals offer a diverse range of entertainment, while it also has a sophisticated side with a superb arts diary.

The Victorian Brighton Pier has plenty of fairground rides, arcades and food options, while the Royal Pavilion is the must see attraction in Brighton. Contrasting Indian architecture with Chinese styled interior and it is one of the most exotically beautiful buildings in Britain. The Lanes offer an eclectic mix of independent shops and boutiques, with its fair share of quirkiness!

Canterbury

Canterbury

South East England

The Romans built a settlement at Canterbury in AD200, and later became the capital of the Saxon Kingdom of Kent. In AD597 St Augustine arrived to bring the Christian message and convert the then King Ethelberht. It's no surprise today then that a visit to Canterbury must include the Cathedral, which is one of the most famous Christian structures in the country and cathedral of the Archbishop of Canterbury, leader of the Church of England and of the worldwide Anglican Church.

The city of Canterbury is great to explore, especially through its traffic-free High Street. You can enjoy a walk along the city walls; visit the West Gate, one of the finest medieval fortified gatehouses in England and offers superb panoramic views of the city. Being a student city it also has its fair share of nightlife and many superb restaurants and eateries.

Hastings

Hastings

South East England

Hastings is a seaside resort and fishing port - The tall wooden huts used for drying the fishing nets still remain. The town also has two cliff railways. It's better known for the battle of Hastings in 1066. However, the most famous battle in England's history actually took place 7 miles further north, where the small town of Battle lies. West of the old town is the beach, and beyond that you'll find lots of Georgian and Victorian buildings. Hastings also boasts a lively arts scene.

The medieval and walled town and port of Rye is further east up the coast, with twisting cobbled streets and lanes and some great old buildings, many of them timber framed. St Mary's church has one of the oldest functioning church turret clocks in the country. You can see it up close by climbing the tower which also offers splendid views of Rye Bay.

Wight

Isle of Wight

South East England

The island has 60 miles of spectacular coastline, with picturesque coves and beautiful bays of golden sand. Inland the countryside is just as stunning, with gentle rolling hills and little lanes to explore. With over 60 miles of cycle ways, the island is a dream for cyclists too. Apart from being one of the prime places for sailing in the UK, the island offers a plethora of sporting activities from fishing and golf to windsurfing and para-gliding.

History lovers will enjoy Carisbrooke Castle, and most will marvel at the extravagance of Osborne House, built for Queen Victoria and Prince Albert.

The island is a short 10 minute journey by hovercraft or catamaran from Portsmouth, while ferries from Southampton and the New Forest take around 30 minutes. A train operates down the east side of the island enabling you to explore the beach resorts of Sandown and Shanklin, while a round the island bus service gets you further afield including the gorgeous bay at Ventnor, or to the western side of the island to Alum Bay and the Needles.

Portsmouth

Portsmouth

South East England

Portsmouth is a historic naval city, principal port of the British Navy and home to the world's oldest dry dock. Home to Lord Nelson's flagship HMS Victory and Henry VIII's Mary Rose, salvaged from the Seabed in 1982, Portsmouth's Historic Dockyard is not to be missed, along with the D-Day museum, while the UK's tallest publicly accessible building the Spinnaker Tower is Portsmouth's latest attraction.

The vibrant Gunwharf Quays situated on the harbourfront, has a plethora of shopping and dining options, while further down the harbour Old Portsmouth offers cobbled streets, atmospheric pubs and a small but interesting cathedral. Southsea offers more family fun in its common and Clarence Pier.

Winchester

Winchester

South East England

Winchester is an ancient Cathedral city and also capital of England between 9th and 11th centuries under the Saxon and Danish Kings. The city has some great architecture along its narrow winding streets.

The Cathedral completed in 1094 contains one of the longest medieval naves in Europe and is one of the best buildings in southern England. The Great Hall of Winchester Castle was built in the 12th century and is famous for King Arthur's round table, which has been hung in the hall since 1463. The names of the Knights of the round table are written around edge of the table, with a picture of King Arthur on his throne.