Where to go

sep

There are thousands of incredible places to visit in the UK and Ireland

Viewing: Wales


Caernarfon

Caernarfon

Wales

Over a century after Julius Caesar first invaded Britain, the Romans finally arrived in North Wales. Their main objective was Ynys Mn (the island of Anglesey), then home of the Druids, teachers and spiritual leaders of the Celtic tribes of Britain and beyond. 77AD saw North West Wales finally conquered, and a fort (Segontium) was established in what is now Caernarfon and became the western frontier of the Roman Empire for over 300 years.

The gem of Caernarfon has to be its impressive castle built by Edward I, whose first son was born there, and led to the British monarch's first son being given the title 'Prince of Wales'.

Cardiff

Cardiff

Wales

Cardiff is the capital city of Wales, and in recent years has developed itself into a truly modern and cosmopolitan place, offering the best in culture, history and sporting entertainment as well as plenty of fine dining and great nightlife.

There are stunning new buildings such as the Millennium Centre – a fantastic arts and cultural venue – the slate and glass Welsh Parliament Building and the Millennium Stadium with its impressive sliding roof. Despite its modern look, the city is not afraid to remember its past and the National Museum – one of the best in Europe – and Cardiff's centrally located Castle do this well.

Cardigan

Cardigan Bay

Wales

The Cardigan Bay coastline is one of Britain's most diverse areas for marine wildlife. It is home to a pod of over 100 bottlenose dolphins as well as porpoises and grey seals. You can enjoy Eco-friendly boat trips out to see the wildlife from New Quay. Picturesque Aberaeron with its stone walled harbour is where you can pick up an award winning honey ice cream while viewing the beautiful brightly coloured house facades which line the streets of the town. Further along the coast, hidden coves and sandy beaches offer an escape from the crowds. You can get great food at the Harbourmaster Restaurant.

Further inland small villages and market towns nestle in the hills and valleys. There are also several nature reserves, home to rare species of flora and fauna. There are plenty of walking trails and a 35 km mountain biking trail in the Cambrian Mountains for the more adventurous!

Conwy

Conwy & Llandudno

Wales

Victorian Buildings dominate the mile long bay and has enabled Llandudno to retain the 19th century ambience which made it the place to stay for Victorians and European royalty alike, as they enjoyed shopping along wrought iron and glass verandas of Mostyn Street that still feature today.

For kids the sandy beach could provide the highlight; others will prefer the 125 year old pier with its plethora of shops, cafes, bars and attractions to suit all tastes; but without doubt, everyone will enjoy the cable-driven tramway to the headland known as the Great Orme with stunning views of the bay below. History lovers will find Great Orme's ancient church and ancient copper mines of great interest, and culture vultures will enjoy the museums and Venue Cymru to take in ballet, comedy or a musical.

Dean

Forest of Dean & Wye Valley

Wales

The Forest of Dean & Wye Valley is a truly magical part of Britain; packed with stunning scenery, enchanting forests, fairy-tale castles, charming churches, dramatic caves, mystical moorlands and truly romantic landscapes. There is so much to do here for both the adventurous explorers, the adrenaline junkies and for anyone who simply appreciates stunning natural beauty. With plenty of towns, villages and landscapes simply waiting to be explored, this is a great place to truly experience natural Britain at its best.

Pembrokeshire

Pembrokeshire

Wales

Pembrokeshire Coast National Park on the south west tip of Wales is a spectacular coastal region, surrounded on three sides by the sea. As well as more blue flag beaches than any other county in Britain, it also has the delightful seaside towns of Tenby and St Davids. Offshore, the marine nature reserve islands of Skomer, Skokholm and Grassholm are home to over half a million seabirds including colonies of puffins, guillemots, gannets and cormorants plus dolphins, porpoises and seals.

Named after the patron saint of Wales, St Davids is an ancient cathedral settlement going back 14 centuries, and is also Britain's smallest city with a population of under 2000. The main focus of the city is its beautiful 12th century cathedral. The narrow streets of this small settlement are home to a vast array of galleries, restaurants and cafe bars. You will see the flag of St David flying here and around Wales – a gold cross on a black background.

Snowdonia

Snowdonia

Wales

Snowdonia National park in North Wales contains some dramatic scenery including over 100 lakes, 90 mountain peaks, including Mount Snowdon which at 3,560ft (1085m) is the highest mountain in England and Wales; and 37 miles of pristine coastline and beaches, moors and wetlands, plus castles, steam railways and more, so if you love the outdoors, with a bit of history thrown in, then Snowdonia is definitely the place for you.

Snowdonia's mountainous landscape makes it perfect for adventure sports like climbing, mountain biking and white water rafting, while there are also plenty of walks from strenuous all day hikes, to a gentle relaxed amble along a lakeside.

Swansea

Swansea

Wales

Birthplace of famous poet Dylan Thomas, Swansea, together with the Victorian seaside neighbour Mumbles make up an extremely vibrant region which also boasts the beautiful Gower Peninsula, Britain's first Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. There are 25 golden beaches on the peninsular some with stunning vistas, while others are tucked away in secluded coves amongst the Gower's fascinating limestone cliffs. The peninsula also has a number of mysterious monuments including Arthur's Stone and Giant's Grave, engraved stones from the Dark Age.
Swansea itself boasts award-winning parks and gardens, fantastic shopping and world class cultural and sporting facilities.

The small village of Mumbles contains a number of great little independent shops and boutiques as well as some of the area's best dining choices.